Webster’s definition of a hero is

Webster’s definition of a hero is, “a person who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities” this is a basic definition because in actuality the definition of hero is more complex. A hero is selfless. Despite the dangers or fears of what may happen, a hero will still do the right thing. A hero is someone who sees something that needs to be done and does it no matter the cost to themselves when I think of a hero I immediately think of someone who is intelligent, strong, and daring. The definition of heroism changes with the context and time. Heroes of the past are not necessarily heroes of present time and vice versa.
A person can be a hero for saving the life of one or of millions. Heroes are not only real people, but they are also fantasy figures. Children are extremely interested with legendary and fantasy figures because they take on such tasks as: difficult journeys, challenges with dragons, discovering lost treasure, and changing the nature of the world through their singular acts of courage and selflessness. They also endure much resistance, hardship, and danger. Often the hero learns valuable lessons about survival, Not only do heroes teach valuable lessons they give a child a sense of belonging. To a child, a hero is an invincible person who will change the world.
However, the media very often attach the word “hero” to anyone that does a good deed. I disagree with this because, good deeds don’t necessarily make you a hero, on the contrary many of those people possess an interior motive to further their own agenda by deceiving the public papulation with a heroic act, nevertheless being heroic should come naturally. Heroes are born, not made. A hero must be courageous, kind-hearted and humble. I understand that many people have their own view on what a hero is. People label heroes by the things they do. Some even label people heroes just because they are famous. There is a big difference between a role model and a hero.