The salient issue is the general unease surrounding the move towards a Smart Nation

The salient issue is the general unease surrounding the move towards a Smart Nation. The government has been gearing their efforts into trying to incorporate technology into daily life, such as with the addition of cashless payment/cashless vendors. The resultant unease stems from the elderly generation in Singapore, who are worried about the cashless system and its implications on them. They are also concerned over the potential job crash, that would come along with the eventual smart nation/technology takeover, they are worried that they would not be able to adapt to the constantly evolving form of technology.
Both sides have valid reasons to both fear and support the move towards a smart nation with the integration of technology. On one hand, there are people who worry about their future in regard to this; If Singapore does become a fully integrated Smart Nation, it would mean that technology is heavily depended on, this would also mean that an individual has to constantly adapt and upgrade themselves due to technology always evolving. Who’s to say that these upgrades are easily accessible? What about smaller business? Would they have the capital to invest in automation and these upgrades? Or will they be stomped out by the monopoly of businesses who can easily acquire the technology?
On the other hand, gearing towards a smart nation, would offer a much better quality of life, with the example of factory workers being replaced by robots/automated systems. The quality of life has improved, as these items are produced faster, and more efficiently, with the addition of technology, it could provide new data-related and technology maintenance jobs that were not once available.
I agree with the people who fear/are at an unease for the smart nation movement.
In many ways, forcing the integration of technology leaves the older generation and those who are lesser off, in the dust. The movement will most definitely extinguish more jobs than it could provide. There is also too big of a grey area, when it comes to the availability and accessibility of these skillset upgrades.