The Particle Theory of Matter is a model which describes the particles

The Particle Theory of Matter is a model which describes the particles, atoms and irons that make up all matter. Key elements of this theory are that: a) all substances—solids, liquids and gases—consist of tiny particles; b) all particles in any substance is in constant movement, even in solids; and c) as they are always in motion, there are always spaces between each particle (D.D, n.d.). Furthermore, in solids, the particles are very attracted and are in a fixed position; in liquids, the particles are still attracted therefore movement is possible though limited; and in gases, there is very little attraction, but collisions and free movement are possible. Moreover, according to the University of Leicester, the particles are either atoms, ions or molecules and the particle movement is based on the amount of energy contained within and their attraction with the surrounding particles (McKeon, 2000).

The Wave Model of Light is a representation of how light moves and travels in waves, not fast-moving particles. This model gives an indication of how light looks and explain its behaviours in different circumstances. When light travels through an opening, it spreads into long or short wavelengths—which in turn represent different frequencies and colours (D.D, n.d.).

With these theories in mind, it is justified for the temperature in the pizza box oven to increase with aluminium as its insulation or any material. When the heat of the sunlight radiation interacts and reflects from the mirror and onto the aluminium foil, it will result in energy transfer from the sun to the mirror then to the foil. The surplus energy transmitted from the sun through light, and absorbed into the material, will increase the kinetic movement of the particles, causing them to collide and spread the energy into the entire object. Moreover, the reflective surface of the foil allows the heat to remained trapped and prevent heat energy from escaping the substance.