New Orleans’s French has its roots from people of African descent and the Acadians from Nova Scotia and parts of South Louisiana after the Spanish took over

New Orleans’s French has its roots from people of African descent and the Acadians from Nova Scotia and parts of South Louisiana after the Spanish took over. The French music was a blend of Cajun music, Blues, R;B, and Jazz. This combination made the Zydeco version of French music that is known today.
The Courir De Mardi Gras in Southwest Louisiana has several cultural meanings to the Cajun people. Tradition says that the day before Ash Wednesday, the people from the rural areas of southwest Louisiana practice “running” Mardi Gras. This is where groups of costumed horse riders or riders in trucks cruise up and down the country roads. The groups stopped along the route at people’s homes and businesses for dancing, singing and pulling pranks. At the end of their visit, they would ask for either a live or frozen chicken, rice, sausage and other ingredients to fix a gumbo at the end of their ride. After the ride, the groups and people they visited return to a barn or dance hall for dancing, singing and eating and drinking. Pg. 159-160 The type of music predominately played at these events is commonly known as Mardi Gras Music, which is composed of Cajun and Zydeco music.