Major General Smedley Butler

Major General Smedley Butler, was a U.S. Marine who disagreed with the United States during World War. Major General Smedley Butler saw it all firsthand and felt that the war was only a way for the United States to gain more financial wealth. As Americans grew richer the troops began to decrease in number by either being hurt, wounded or some even killed during the World War. When the World War took effect the United States saw it as an opportunity yet made it seem that going to war was the right thing to do at that time, but yet only wanted it to continue so they could continue to bank off of it. The soldiers that were fighting in the war were not told that they had a chance of not making it out alive and the disaster that they would face and that is what bothered Major General Smedley Butler. Even though he was a high rank in the United States Marines he too felt it was wrong how the United States got so in debt during the war costing well around 52,000,000,000 dollars and how it would take generations to pay off the debt that was incurred during the war. When the war wasn’t going on a normal business would gain anywhere from six to ten percent and at times reaching twelve percent but once the war broke out the percentages skyrocketed increasing anywhere from twenty to the highest of eighteen hundred percent.
Eugen Debs felt that when Americans would use the Freedom of Speech they would get punished by saying how they felt or even as to what they thought. The working class were the ones who went to war and fought hard yet they still had no rights or choices. All the rights were still left up to the ruling class to decide what would go on. Debs also argued that the people were never given the opportunity as citizens to appoint the court systems that it was all an inside thing as to how they got appointed. After the judges were appointed they were only there to help out only the ones that got them in their position and not serve the people as it should’ve been all along. “And here let me emphasize the fact-and it cannot be repeated too often-that the working class who fight all the battles, the working class who make the supreme sacrifices, the working class who freely shed their blood and furnish the corpses, have never yet had a voice in either declaring war or making peace.” “It is the ruling class that invariably does both.”