Introduction Baking has been around since years ago and it had been part and parcel of our lives but who would have thought that baking has some of its own hidden agenda which is building self-esteem and bringing joy to most individual with a mental condition even if it is just a simple cookie to bake alone or with loved ones

Introduction
Baking has been around since years ago and it had been part and parcel of our lives but who would have thought that baking has some of its own hidden agenda which is building self-esteem and bringing joy to most individual with a mental condition even if it is just a simple cookie to bake alone or with loved ones. Many may ask why baking and not some other things to do.

This review will provide further evidence to support baking therapy benefits and understand why baking is one of the many ways to help our clients in building confidence and self-esteem but most of all having a good time baking even though we had no knowledge ongoing about how to bake.

Content
There are indeed many ways of achieving confidence and self-esteem. Findings had identified that this opportunity allows clients to acquire new skills and most importantly confidence while baking on their own. Clients who are influenced by baking added baking to their daily routine.

Previously explored by Mee and Sumsion (2001), Chugg and Craik (2002), Fieldhouse (2003), they identified baking increase motivation and meaningfulness through reinforcing individuals the purpose and planning of time. Environment plays a part in facilitating clients making their own decisions and free from pressure. They gain new skills, coping with challenges, opportunity in experiencing success, develop social relationships, increased self-esteem and improved sense of self.

Reported by Melton (1998), the importance of skill development and confidence also engaging in baking improved concentration, increased coordination and built confidence leading to increasing a feeling of self-esteem. Suggested by Porter et al (1999) successful performance promotes a feeling of competency.

Identified by participants, having an opportunity to make something and be able to keep or share it with others was beneficial. Noted by Murphy et al (1998) product not only increase motivation but also made the activity more absorbing, challenging and competency promoting. Baking therapy can provide experiences of success and promote improved functioning.

Conclusion
A limitation could be lack of articles relating to baking within mental health literature as identified by Guerrero (2001) but earlier study by Kremer et al (1984) reasons for most positive factors include satisfaction, importance of end products that can be eaten or kept, an activity that is age and culturally appropriate and since it is concrete and understandable, is seen as meaningful and valued. Participants indicated they were able to work towards a sense of their own confidence and competency.

Therefore, we conclude that baking therapy has many benefits as evidenced by research article and it helps to boost confidence and self-esteem of the individual. We would facilitate better with the information we acquired and a better understanding of the outcome of baking therapy. We will ensure our baking therapy is properly planned to allow our participants to have a therapeutic feeling while kneading and baking in our workshop.

“Who needs a stress ball when you’ve got a decent lump of dough to knead?