For this extra credit opportunity I chose to watch the documentary entitled “Secret State of North Korea”

For this extra credit opportunity I chose to watch the documentary entitled “Secret State of North Korea”. Before I comment on the short film’s potential parallelism to the reading material of the course, I feel it appropriate to first review the short film. Released by PBS ‘Frontline’ in 2014, the documentary offers a “look” into the dictatorship of North Korea by use of illegal footage provided by an undercover network of journalists and North Koreans. Thusly, this documentary takes first hand experience and testimonials from a handful of almost 20,000 defectors living in South Korea to tell a story of the current state of public affairs in North Korea. Notably, what I found intriguing was a presentation of two interrelated themes on the “state’s” battlefront, that is North Korea versus its borders, (rather the increasing exposure to illegal foreign media; For example, a defector named Jeong Kwang-Il. Is depicted to regularly smuggle foreign entertainment into North Korea on thumb drives and DVDs for sale in the countries black market) and North Korea versus internal factions (shown in instances of shared ideological resistance, first by a woman who frustratingly yells and pushes a soldier who attempts to penalize her for wearing pants publicly and secondly