Caliban: The Offspring of the Witch Sycorax essay

He discovers much about himself and the world during the course of the play We develop a sympathy for his character because of his suffering and attempt to change Clinical changes significantly according to the context Clinical has been interpreted in many ways over time and is a complex harasser who can be seen in terms of colonialism and a ‘noble savage’, an instinctual beast, a revolutionary and manipulator among others Initially we see Clinical as a slave, but one who wants to control his own destiny. Clinical wants independence and manipulates to get it Clinical is dark and serious but also contributes to the humor (e. . The scene where he tries to hide from Stephan). Clinical is not civilized enough to return from the island to Milan Clinical remains monstrous and savage, but the potential is there. Clinical can discover how to find lordship and grace He discovers the human world tit all its complexities. He discovers its (human kind) beauty, its duplicity and its maliciousness. He is ungrateful for human kind. He has a hatred for and a lack of gratitude for Prosper which is contrasted with his admiration and respect for Prosperous power.

Prosperous power is through force and fear rather than intelligence of guidance. Clinical initially communicates through vulgar language and complaints which represent his savage beastly nature. When he speaks about human nature we see curses, when he speaks about the natural environment, he speaks in beautiful verses At the end, Clinical is men as more honorable, more delicate and more perceptive. We the viewers are able to see this side of Clinical temporarily but Miranda and Prosper never see it He discovers his wrongs at the end of the play and seeks to rectify these. Ill be wise hereafter and seek grace, what a thrice double-ass was I to take this drunken for a god and worship this dull for it’ 0 he uses a self-deprecating tone (putting himself down). In the end, he ends up being a little nobler. To the audience he IS seen as being nobler than several of the other characters/social superiors in the play (Antonio Stephan Orinoco) At the end we see self growth in Clinical Clinical is an example of the negative impact of physical discoveries colonialism He is an individual that is entrapped by a foreigner/foreign civilization which is represented by prosper.

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His island has been taken from him through prosper ironically like prosperous kingdom was taken from him His speech about the island and its giving qualities lets us know that he is the original native/inhabitant of the island. He also discovers the good side to human nature when he sees prosper forgive He never repents for the apparent rape of Miranda despite prosperous high importance on marinara’s virginity before marriage. Clinical represents the most basic elements of nature. He has discovered the human world, its duplicity, corruption and its beauty through the interaction of people who have been vanished to the island.

While meeting Stefan and Trujillo it is revealed the value of money compared to people in the human world. Trujillo and Stefan saw Clinical as an opportunity to make money out off in a European country Stefan and Trujillo represent how low civilized men can sink without self-control. Both en are opportunists, ready to exploit the new “man” they discovered Clinical is another Of Prosperous servants. Clinical, the son of the now- deceased witch Scoria, acquainted Prosper with the island when Prosper arrived. Clinical believes that the island rightfully belongs to him and has been stolen by Prosper.

His speech and behavior is sometimes coarse and brutal, as in his drunken scenes with Stephan and Trujillo (al. Ii, IV. i), and sometimes eloquent and sensitive, as in his rebukes of Prosper in Act l, scene ii, and in his description of the eerie beauty of the island in Act Ill, scene ii (Ill. i. 1 30-138). Prosperous dark, earthy slave, frequently referred to as a monster by the other characters, Clinical is the son of a witch-hag and the only real native of the island to appear in the play. He is an extremely complex figure, and he mirrors or parodies several other characters in the play.

In his first speech to Prosper, Clinical insists that Prosper stole the island from him. Through this speech, Clinical suggests that his situation is much the same as Prosperous, whose brother usurped his dukedom. On the other hand, Scallion’s desire for sovereignty of the island mirrors the lust for rower that led Antonio to overthrow Prosper. Scallion’s conspiracy with Stephan and Trujillo to murder Prosper mirrors Antonio and Sebastian plot against Alonso, as well as Antonio and Alonso original conspiracy against Prosper.

Clinical both mirrors and contrasts with Prosperous other servant, Ariel. While Ariel is “an airy spirit,” Clinical is of the earth, his speeches turning to “springs, brine pits” (l. Ii. 341 “bogs, fens, flats” (al. Ii 2), or crabapple and pigpens (al. Ii. 1 59-160). While Ariel maintains his dignity and his freedom by serving Prosper willingly, Clinical achieves a different kind of dignity by refusing, if only sporadically, to bow before Prosperous intimidation. Surprisingly, Clinical also mirrors and contrasts with Ferdinand in certain ways.

In Act II, scene ii Clinical enters “with a burden of wood,” and Ferdinand enters in Act Ill, scene i “bearing a log. ” Both Clinical and Ferdinand profess an interest in untying Marinara’s ‘Virgin knot. ” Ferdinand plans to marry her, while Clinical has attempted to rape her. The glorified, romantic, almost ethereal love of Ferdinand for Miranda starkly contrasts with Scallion’s desire o impregnate Miranda and people the island with Sicilians. Finally, and most tragically, Clinical becomes a parody of himself.

In his first speech to Prosper, he regretfully reminds the magician of how he showed him all the ins and outs of the island when Prosper first arrived. Only a few scenes later, however, we see Clinical drunk and fawning before a new magical being in his life: Stephan and his bottle of liquor. Soon, Clinical begs to show Stephan the island and even asks to lick his shoe. Clinical repeats the mistakes he claims to curse. In his final act of rebellion, he is once more entirely subdued by Prosper in the most petty way?he is dunked in a stinking bog and ordered to clean up Prosperous cell in preparation for dinner.

Despite his savage demeanor and grotesque appearance, however, Clinical has a nobler, more sensitive side that the audience is only allowed to glimpse briefly, and which Prosper and Miranda do not acknowledge at all. His beautiful speeches about his island home provide some of the most affecting imagery in the play, reminding the audience that Clinical really did occupy the island before Prosper came, and that he may be right in thinking his enslavement to be monstrously unjust.

Scallion’s swarthy appearance, his forced servitude, and his native status on the island have led many readers to interpret him as a symbol of the native cultures occupied and suppressed by European colonial societies, which are represented by the power of Prosper. Whether or not one accepts this allegory, Clinical remains one of the most intriguing and ambiguous minor characters in all of Shakespeare, a sensitive monster who allows himself to be transformed into a fool. “Clinical discovers You taught me language; and my profit onto Is, I know how to curse.

The red plague rid you For learning me your language! ” Clinical is denouncing Prosper for teaching (“learning”) him his language, declaring that the only good Prosperous language has done him is enabling him to curse; Clinical gives an immediate example of his cursing ability by calling upon the red plague to destroy Prosper for teaching him his language. “Be not afeard. The isle is full of noises… Cried to dream again” (Act 3 scene, 130-138) He discovers his ability to think and speak in a civilized way – aggressive evolution of his character.

This speech is Scallion’s explanation to Stephan ND Trujillo of mysterious music that they hear by magic. Though he claims that the chief virtue of his newly learned language is that it allows him to curse, Clinical here shows himself capable of using speech in a most sensitive and beautiful fashion. “I’ll be wise hereafter and seek grace, what a thrice double-ass was I to take this drunken for a god and worship this dull for it’ He discovers his wrongs at the end of the play and seeks to rectify these. He uses a self-deprecating tone (putting himself down). In the end, he ends up being a little nobler and more honorable.

To the audience he is seen as being nobler Han several of the Other characters/social superiors in the play (Antonio, Stephan, Trujillo) “A southwest blow on ye And blister you all o’er! ” “And here you sty me In this hard rock, whiles you do keep from me The rest o’ the’ island. ” He is ungrateful for human kind. He has a hatred for and a lack of gratitude for Prosper which is contrasted with his admiration and respect for Prosperous power. He discovers the human world with all its complexities. He discovers its (human kind) beauty, its duplicity and its maliciousness. Mar-I, ‘Ban, Caecilian Has a new master: get new man.

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